If they prescribe me medication that does not have a generic form ...

 I have to forfeit that medication. I don't know what it feels like to be out of pain, because I live with it every day.  

Sometimes I decide whether I'm going to get medication or pay my electric bill. 

An electric bill weighs on me a little bit more because I don't want to be in the dark. If my doctor prescribes medication that does not have a generic form I have to forfeit that medication. I don't know what it feels like to be out of pain, because I live with it every day.

Myra M.

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My drugs are so expensive ...

most times it is pay the bills or get my medications.

My drugs are so expensive, I have to choose which ones are most important and that is what I will get. 

Most days it is pay the bills or get my medications. I dose them out, so I can afford them (which is not how my doctor prescribed them). All of this increases my stress and sends me into another flare. The same can be said for over the counter medications. I was a nurse for 30 years and thought I had seen it all. I was so wrong then!

Rosemary P.

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Our medications are so expensive ...

that I must choose between my son receiving his treatment or myself. Ultimately, that is no choice at all. My child always comes first.”

Accessing health care is a constant struggle for my family.

My son has special needs and I have a rare, painful disease that deforms my hands and feet. Although I have worked full-time for over 20 years, our medications are so expensive that I must choose between my son receiving his treatment or myself. Ultimately, that is no choice at all. My child always comes first.

It is ridiculous that throughout the month, I ration or stop taking the eight different medications that keep my hands functioning well enough to tuck my son in at night. It is unacceptable that my health and mobility are declining, threatening my job and my ability to care for my child. My health affects my son’s and my son’s affects my family’s, everyone suffering all because a company wants more money.

Why is this happening? Why are the medications so expensive?

Rochelle D., California

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Tell your story.

Every day, millions of patients deal with sudden price changes and rising costs of prescription drugs. Do you have a similar experience to share? Congress needs to hear directly from the patients who are suffering and the physicians who see every day the impact of rising drug prices.

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I have to tell the pharmacy to keep [ my prescriptions] because even with insurance I can’t afford them.

I have to tell the pharmacy to keep [ my prescriptions] because even with insurance I can’t afford them. 

It’s already hitting me hard. I have insurance and with the price of some of my prescriptions, I have to tell the pharmacy to keep them because even with insurance I can’t afford them.

@daniel_virginia

My ex-husband has prostate cancer that has metastasized everywhere. He gets a shot called Lupron Depot; He gets the shot every 6 months. The first shot was $47,000. It is now over $48,000. That's right. $48,000 for one shot.

My ex-husband has prostate cancer that has metastasized everywhere. The drugs given to help combat this disease wreak havoc on your system.

He gets a shot called Lupron Depot; it shuts down testosterone and the other hormones. He gets the shot every 6 months. The first shot was $47,000. It is now over $48,000. That's right. $48,000 for one shot. 
We went to pick up a lidocaine pain cream. It was over $300 for a 6-ounce tube. We refused it. We were then told Medicare would cover it. We still refused it. Even insurance should not be expected to pay inflated prices.
.
The profits before patients is becoming an all-too-often occurrence.
 

Janis H.

[I] must omit appointments and some medications to continue to stay [on top of] paying bills because of excessive prices on medications.

[I] must omit appointments and some medications to continue to stay [on top of] paying bills because of excessive prices on medications and continual increases despite health insurance coverage [that I] worked for years to earn! 

Mary E.

My 81-year-old grandma can't pay bills and afford her medication.

My 81-year-old grandma can't pay bills and afford her medication.

They keep prescribing her more medication that is supposed to help her, but she can't afford it with her Supplemental Security Income and Medicaid [doesn’t] cover all the cost. 

Tabitha S.

I would sit in the same room with others who were facing bankruptcy and decisions as to whether to go without treatment due to the cost.

I was taking infusion drugs for arthritis that kept me being able to live a normal, independent life.

Each infusion at 8-week intervals required me to miss a half day of work and cost $3,000.00 per infusion. I had health insurance and only had to pay the co-pay, which I could manage. However, I would sit in the same room with others who were facing bankruptcy and decisions as to whether to go without treatment due to the cost. Had I foregone the treatments, I'm sure I would be in a nursing home today, instead of actively contributing to our society. The mark-up of the drug prices is ridiculous and it’s taking advantage of those who need help the most.

Marilyn W.

I'm on Social Security fixed income [and] I cannot afford [my medicines].

There are very few medicines I can take for my eyes because I'm so highly allergic to nearly all of them. 

[For the] two that I take, one is $135 a month and the other is $270 a month. I'm on Social Security fixed income [and] I cannot afford [my medicines].

Dana R.

You retire and have a fixed income, and retirees are taking 1/2 doses or taking their meds every other day in many cases.

So far, Janumet is the only drug to help with my diabetes. It's always $400-500 per month.

Tried Metformin on its own and my A1C went way up. I am a benefit's advocate for GE retirees, and this is an ongoing issue with many drugs. Insulin, inhalers and other meds remain at their highest. You retire and have a fixed income, and retirees are taking 1/2 doses or taking their meds every other day in many cases.

Melody J.

The cost can be anywhere from $180.00 to $360.00 a month depending on the amount of insulin injected. This seems to be an extravagant increase in price [for something] that so many people use to help stay alive.

As a diabetic, I use two types of insulin twice a day.

In less than a year for a 100 ml vial of each type of insulin, my cost has gone from a $30.00 to a $90.00 co-pay for each. Generally, I use more than 1 vial a month for each type of insulin. The cost can be anywhere from $180.00 to $360.00 a month depending on the amount of insulin injected. This seems to be an extravagant increase in price [for something] that so many people use to help stay alive. 

Marsha S.

Sometimes I skip my insulin because the cost is outrageous.

I am 83 and on a fixed income.

I have to take insulin four times a day. Sometimes I skip [because] the cost is outrageous.

Marilyn G.

I got two months of Chantix to quit smoking and without Insurance it’s almost $600 a month. Just ridiculous!

I got two months of Chantix to quit smoking and without insurance it’s almost $600 a month. Thank god I have insurance. Just ridiculous!  

Crystal H.

I go without medication that could save my life should I get stung.

I go without medication that could save my life should I get stung.

I went to get my EpiPen refilled, only to find it cost $710.00. We are trying to survive on my husband's disability check of only $1,200.00, while raising our two daughters. So, I go without medication that could save my life should I get stung.

Tamarah H.

I am disabled with daily headaches from stroke in 2006. I cannot afford medication.

I am disabled with daily headaches from stroke in 2006. I cannot afford medication.

Darlenia L.

[…] I’m soon going to have to choose between food and meds. And if that’s the case, I’m going to die a quick death.

[…] I’m soon going to have to choose between food and meds. And if that’s the case, I’m going to die a quick death.

I’m a double post kidney transplant recipient: 2006 and 2016. I take anti-rejection meds as well as heart meds… With the increase in the price of meds, I’m soon going to have to choose between food or meds. And if that’s the case, I’m going to die a quick death.

June K.

It is obscene that I could not locate an EpiPen for my elementary school children. The cost is outrageous.

It is obscene that I could not locate an EpiPen for my elementary school children. The cost is outrageous. 

It is obscene that I could not locate an EpiPen for my elementary school children. The cost is outrageous, and I finally received a huge discount from $700 to $360. What greed—the price of these EpiPens, and then they become out of stock!

Gayle C.

I would imagine their original goal in developing these drugs was to “help people” not to “get rich while hurting people."

I would imagine their original goal in developing these drugs was to “help people” not to “get rich while hurting people."

I have several chronic illnesses that require expensive medications. One of those is Type 1 diabetes which requires two types of insulin to live; even a week without it would put my body into ketoacidosis which would quickly cause kidney failure and lead to death soon after. Even the insulins that have been around for many years and their generics are $300-$500 per box. Now multiply that by two, because I require a long-acting insulin and a short- acting insulin. A huge thing I don’t understand is why insulin would cost hundreds still, when it’s common sense that the research companies, investors, and inventor have long been paid back for their time, money, and resources as well as huge profits. So why are they taking from those of us who are barely treading water and are just trying to stay alive literally? I would imagine their original goal in developing these drugs was to “help people” not to “get rich while hurting people.” 

Robin G.

I shouldn’t have to pitch out hundreds of dollars for my or my kid’s medicine; it’s ridiculous.

I shouldn’t have to pitch out hundreds of dollars for my or my kid’s medicine; it’s ridiculous.

Brittany N.

My drug cost jumped from $175.00 to $435.00 per month. No one has been able to explain this huge jump.

My drug cost jumped from $175.00 to $435.00 per month. No one has been able to explain this huge jump.

I have never been in the Medicare Part D donut hole before, and have been taking the same drug for over 4 years…no one has been able to explain this huge jump.

James T.

Lyrica, 60 pills for $90. Next order was $115. Third time was $173. Seems like some pretty unreasonable increases.

Lyrica, 60 pills for $90. Next order was $115. Third time was $173. Seems like some pretty unreasonable increases.

Betty F.

Type 1 diabetics cannot live without insulin on a daily basis, and it is a slap in the face to charge the kind of money they do.

Type 1 diabetics cannot live without insulin on a daily basis, and it is a slap in the face to charge the kind of money they do. 

The price of insulin for my husband is outrageous. I find it hard to believe that the government or the public for that matter allow these costs to keep skyrocketing. Type 1 diabetics cannot live without this medication on a daily basis, and it is a slap in the face to charge the kind of money they do.

Patricia K.

The problem with the high prices of meds is out of control on every level. I don't care if you're rich or poor, Why are there so many levels in the prescription drug supply chain?

The problem with the high prices of meds is out of control on every level. I don't care if you're rich or poor, Why are there so many levels in the prescription drug supply chain?

I have epilepsy. I am on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). I take 3 medications, one of which doesn't have a generic yet. The patent doesn't expire until 2022. It costs me $800 for a 3-month supply, after paying  $1200 for my first 3-month supply of the year because of my $400 deductible. Another one of the meds I take is over 100 years old: Phenobarbital. It dates back to 1914. When my husband had a nice insurance plan I paid $3.96 for a 90-day supply. Now on Medicare, I pay anywhere between $50 to $114 for a 90-day supply. The stuff is cheaper than aspirin and here I am paying this amount of money for it. I don't make a lot of money on SSDI. I'm unable to work because I can't concentrate well enough these days and these meds also have horrible side effects that make me short-tempered. They also make me tired since they're sedatives. But the problem with the high prices of meds is out of control on every level. I don't care if you're rich or poor, Why are there so many levels in the prescription drug supply chain? 

Lauran R.

My medications are too expensive, and I can't afford them. Lawmakers need to support a bill addressing medication prices.

My medications are too expensive, and I can't afford them. Lawmakers need to support a bill addressing medication prices.

Nathan T.

My drug costs doubled in less than a month. […] Clearly someone is cheating.

My drug costs doubled in less than a month. I asked my pharmacy if they had changed suppliers and they said no, that the manufacturer had increased its prices. The pharmacy did not know why.

I checked with my Part D coverage and they said that the increased cost was due to an increase in the cost of ingredients. I contacted the supplier via email and was informed that there was no increase in the cost of the drug. Clearly someone is cheating. I have opted for an over-the-counter solution after consulting with a physician for alternatives. Thankfully there was an alternative, unlike those who require specific life-sustaining drugs. 

Shirley S.

My mom’s drug is Mestinon, and it costs $245. It's outrageous. She can't afford that every month. What can we do?

My mom’s drug is Mestinon, and it costs $245. It's outrageous. She can't afford that every month. What can we do?

Christina C.

We discovered that my patient would have to pay MORE if they used their insurance for their prescription compared to just paying cash.

We discovered that my patient would have to pay MORE if they used their insurance for their prescription compared to just paying cash. 

Dr. J. Augusto B.

I have to use my food money to pay for my monthly meds.

I have to use food money to pay for my monthly meds.

Virginia O.

I’ve had several family members and friends who have had to go without their medications because they weren’t financially able to pay for them. It’s extremely difficult and painful to watch or hear about this.

I've had several family members and friends who have had to go without their medications because they weren't financially able to pay for them. 

Medications are way too expensive and the sad part is some rely on their medications to survive. It’s extremely difficult and painful to watch or hear about this. 

Ginny H.

I don't want to go bankrupt over exorbitant drug prices.

I don't want to go bankrupt over exorbitant drug prices.

I'm in treatment for graft vs. host disease and red cell aplasia following a bone marrow transplant. One immunosuppressant costs $3000 per month; my copay is $85. Once I hit the Medicare Part D "donut hole" it costs $750 per month for 3 months. Last year I spent $16,000 on medical bills, quickly using up my retirement savings. I don't want to go bankrupt over exorbitant drug prices. Even old, standard ointments like Lidocaine cost $250.00 for a 15g tube. 

Diane F.

Some of these drugs are not new ones; they have been around for over 25 years. They used to cost very little.

Some of these drugs are not new ones; they have been around for over 25 years. They used to cost very little.

I had my first heart attack, and I am having to spend over $500 a month to take the cardiac medications I require. Some of these drugs are not new ones; they have been around for over 25 years. They used to cost very little. 

Kenneth W.

In January, the cost will skyrocket, and I will stop taking the drug because I will not be able afford the co-pay.

In January, the cost will skyrocket, and I will stop taking the drug because I will not be able afford the co-pay. 

I currently self-inject a medication to slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis. My co-pay is barely affordable. In January, the cost will skyrocket, and I will stop taking the drug because I will not be able afford the co-pay. This will change the course of the quality of my life in a hugely negative way. I’m terrified.

M'Lis G.

For the last couple of years, I have had to stop taking most of my meds because I can’t afford them.

. For the last couple of years, I have had to stop taking most of my meds because I can’t afford them. 

I take many prescription drugs as I have several different health problems. My husband and I are on Social Security. We have no other income as our savings has been used for all my medical bills. For the last couple of years, I have had to stop taking most of my meds because I can’t afford them. They get more expensive year by year. What are we supposed to do? I’m taking my life in my hands when I go without my meds!

Rae A.

There are plenty of times I don’t take the medications I need because I can’t afford the co-pays.

There are plenty of times I don't take medications I need because I can't afford the co-pays.

There are plenty of times I don’t take the medications I need because I can’t afford the co-pays. I am on Social Security and Medicare, but co-pays on a fixed income are hard to afford. I have COPD, back problems, and non-alcohol related cirrhosis. I live in fear.

Theresa S.

I’ve had to cut out needed medications because of the high cost.

I’ve had to cut out needed medications because of the high cost. 

I’ve had to cut out needed medications because of the high cost. Even with insurance, I just can’t afford them because I am on a limited income.

David D.

My husband has serious eye disease and is at risk of going blind, but his meds are more than we can afford on a fixed income.

My husband has serious eye disease and is at risk of going blind, but his meds are more than we can afford on a fixed income. 

Geraldine P.

Last month one of my prescription medications went from $107 for a 1-month supply to $186 for a 1- month supply, and that is the generic form.

Last month one of my prescription medications went from $107 for a 1-month supply to $186 for a 1- month supply, and that is the generic form. 

Jeff T.

[My son] uses a rescue inhaler instead that barely works just to survive.

[My son] uses a rescue inhaler instead that barely works just to survive. 

My son has asthma. Without insurance, the inhaler that he must have is $400 a month, which he cannot afford. Instead, [he] uses a rescue inhaler that barely works just to survive. 

Danny R.

Then my employer switched to another insurance plan, and I now have to pay over $1000 a month for my prescription...

Then my employer switched to another insurance plan, and I now have to pay over $1000 a month for my prescription...

I suffer from daily, debilitating chronic migraines. Three years ago, I was paying $50 every 90 days for the medication I take to stop my migraines. Then my employer switched to another insurance plan, and I now have to pay over $1000 a month for my prescription. I simply can’t afford that and try to manage without. It has resulted in many lost days of work. I am afraid of losing my job.

Cheryl M.

Medications are way too expensive. It affects my family and me.

Medications are way too expensive. It affects my family and me. 

Medications are way too expensive. It affects my family and me. We can't afford them. We need cheaper medications.

Kadian W.

I have multiple chronic illnesses [including rheumatoid arthritis] and I can’t afford the medication.

I have multiple chronic illnesses [including rheumatoid arthritis] and I can’t afford the medication. 

[I have] high deductible health insurance through work. I have multiple chronic illnesses...one of which is rheumatoid arthritis. I can't afford the medication. Even my prescription asthma medication isn't affordable - it's over $100! 

Mea C.

I stopped using an inhaler because I could not afford it.

I stopped using an inhaler because I could not afford it. 

I can tell you that my mother’s medicine went up for diabetes, so she had to stop taking it. It tripled in price. I stopped using an inhaler because I could not afford it. They just keep raising the prices of prescription drugs so people can’t afford them. 

Robin O.

Its generic is no longer being manufactured, so Donnatal now costs $5/pill. How do I budget for that?

 Its generic is no longer being manufactured, so Donnatal now costs $5/pill. How do I budget for that?

I have IBS and need an antispasmodic (Donnatal). Its generic is no longer being manufactured, so Donnatal now costs $5/pill. How do I budget for that?

Helene S.

My cost has gone from $26 in 2011 to $157 last month.

My cost has gone from $26 in 2011 to $157 last month. 

My thyroid pills are not covered by insurance. My cost has gone from $26 in 2011 to $157 last month. 

Linda D.

Choice [is] sometimes a roof over your head or your medication.

Choice [is] sometimes a roof over your head or your medication. 

Insulin is out of sight price wise. Close to $200 a vial now.

Patricia Ann S.

I have to tell the pharmacy to keep [ my prescriptions] because even with insurance I can’t afford them.

I have to tell the pharmacy to keep [ my prescriptions] because even with insurance I can’t afford them. 

It’s already hitting me hard. I have insurance and with the price of some of my prescriptions, I have to tell the pharmacy to keep them because even with insurance I can’t afford them.

@daniel_virginia

Why shouldn’t patients be told how much drugs cost to make?

Why shouldn’t patients be told how much drugs cost to make? 

@Rev_AlinS

The price is so high that I have to endure the headaches.

The price is so high that I have to endure the headaches.

I suffer from debilitating headaches, controlled with sumatriptan injections. Even with insurance, my cost is $100 per injection. I'm 63 years old and on Social Security and Medicare. The price is so high that I have to endure the headaches.

Rick B.

Six years ago, I began cutting doses of four non-generics for diabetes in half or not refilling.

Six years ago, I began cutting doses of four non-generics for diabetes in half or not refilling

Six years ago, I began cutting doses of four non-generics for diabetes in half or not refilling in order to afford four Tier 4 scripts. I don't have to remind anyone with diabetes on Medicare the obscene costs of brand name insulin and oral medications. My husband and I shop frugally, and there's nowhere else to cut. 

Jo C.

Over the years, the medication went from $5 to $10 a month and then suddenly, in 2015, it went to over $250 per month.

Over the years, the medication went from $5 to $10 a month and then suddenly, in 2015, it went to over $250 per month.

Since 1998, I have taken a generic medication. I was put on Corgard® (Nadolol). Over the years, the medication went from $5 to $10 a month and then suddenly, in 2015, it went to over $250 per month. That did not include what insurance covered. I have never been able to get a straight answer from the manufacturer. As I work for a hard-working family practice doctor, I have seen it all, and this is only one of many such issues.

Diane G.

Every year when my health insurance deductible resets, I stop my treatments

because my child has asthma and his ability to breathe is more important than my ability to walk.

Every year when my health insurance deductible resets, I stop my treatments

for neuropathy and chronic pain because my child has asthma. His ability to breathe with the help of five daily medications is more important than my ability to walk.

@Mama_Mandria

My doctor wanted me on an inhalant. It was $276.

My doctor wanted me on an inhalant. It was $276. 

My doctor wanted me on an inhalant. Okay, I went to get it filled and gave it right back to the pharmacy. It was $276. No freaking way I could afford it. This is WITH insurance. I can’t take the medication and sacrifice paying my other bills.

Dianne J.

I have to use an inhaler to breathe.

I have to use an inhaler to breathe.

I just ordered a three-month supply that cost me $571.35. I have hit the Medicare coverage gap and it isn't even a full three months into the year. That is over half of my income. That is the price with insurance. What am I supposed to do if I can’t breathe?

Patsy A.

I cannot afford $30,000/ year.

I am now without the medication that has been so effective.

Statistically, I should be in a wheelchair by now, 

but with a lot of self-care and discipline, hard work and compliance with my medication and exercise, I am doing well. I've had multiple sclerosis a long time! I work part time, volunteer when I can and keep a positive spirit. I take one medication and it is to prevent the MS from worsening. My insurance pays most of it, but my co-pay is $2,500/month. I've been getting "extra help" for the copay through Social Security since my copay cost is more than my entire income. But, I just took my last dose. I was notified that I am no longer getting the assistance for the copay. I cannot afford $30,000/ year in copay. A nursing home would cost a lot more. I am now without the medication that has been so effective and am really worried.

Anna Beth A.

My family watched as I grew sicker.

I am someone’s daughter, sister, best friend, and neighbor, and we all suffered because I couldn’t afford the health care I needed.”

I am from a small town. I never had a lot of money, but I was content with life.

I worked hard and lived within my means. Then, I was diagnosed with liver disease.

I went from walking six miles a day to sleeping constantly. My doctor found a cocktail of medications that helped. But, my prescriptions were $1,900 a month, not counting doctor’s visits. Liver pills alone were around $500. This left me only $5 at the end of every two weeks for food and gas.

Eventually, I had to stop treatment to make ends meet. My family watched as I grew sicker. It wasn’t until I qualified for assistance that things started to turn around, but my body went through irreversible damage from the lapse in treatment.

I am someone’s daughter, sister, best friend, and neighbor, and we all suffered because I couldn’t afford the health care I needed.

Anna M., Missouri

But then the price went up. Way up.

When I switched to Medicare the cost became $10,000 a year. That was $2,000 for a single prescription.”

I have severe Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Luckily, I discovered Humira, a shot that could keep down inflammation and ease my bone deterioration. I received Humira for $5, with insurance. With my pain managed, I could spend time with my family and friends, my arthritis no longer dominating my life.

But then the price went up. Way up.

When I switched to Medicare, the cost became $10,000 a year. That was $2,000 for a single prescription or a $1,995 difference between insurers. How is that possible?

I wrote the manufacturer, applied for assistance, but nothing worked, so I stopped taking the drug. My bones became weak and crippled. My life was no longer my own and to this day, I still don’t know why. 

Bonnie O., Connecticut