If they prescribe me medication that does not have a generic form...

I have to forfeit that medication. I don't know what it feels like to be out of pain, because I live with it every day.
Sometimes I decide whether I'm going to get medication or pay my electric bill.
An electric bill weighs on me a little bit more because I don't want to be in the dark. If my doctor prescribes medication that does not have a generic form I have to forfeit that medication. I don't know what it feels like to be out of pain, because I live with it every day.
Myra M.
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My drugs are so expensive...

most times it is pay the bills or get my medications.
My drugs are so expensive, I have to choose which ones are most important and that is what I will get.
Most days it is pay the bills or get my medications. I dose them out, so I can afford them (which is not how my doctor prescribed them). All of this increases my stress and sends me into another flare. The same can be said for over the counter medications. I was a nurse for 30 years and thought I had seen it all. I was so wrong then!
Rosemary P.
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Our medications are so expensive...

that I must choose between my son receiving his treatment or myself. Ultimately, that is no choice at all. My child always comes first.”
Accessing health care is a constant struggle for my family.

My son has special needs and I have a rare, painful disease that deforms my hands and feet. Although I have worked full-time for over 20 years, our medications are so expensive that I must choose between my son receiving his treatment or myself. Ultimately, that is no choice at all. My child always comes first.

It is ridiculous that throughout the month, I ration or stop taking the eight different medications that keep my hands functioning well enough to tuck my son in at night. It is unacceptable that my health and mobility are declining, threatening my job and my ability to care for my child. My health affects my son’s and my son’s affects my family’s, everyone suffering all because a company wants more money.

Why is this happening? Why are the medications so expensive?

Rochelle D., California
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We discovered that my patient would have to pay MORE if they used their insurance for their prescription compared to just paying cash.

We discovered that my patient would have to pay MORE if they used their insurance for their prescription compared to just paying cash.
Dr. J. Augusto B.

I have to use my food money to pay for my monthly meds.

I have to use food money to pay for my monthly meds.
Virginia O.

I’ve had several family members and friends who have had to go without their medications because they weren’t financially able to pay for them. It’s extremely difficult and painful to watch or hear about this.

Medications are way too expensive and the sad part is some rely on their medications to survive.
I've had several family members and friends who have had to go without their medications because they weren't financially able to pay for them.
Medications are way too expensive and the sad part is some rely on their medications to survive. It’s extremely difficult and painful to watch or hear about this.
Ginny H.

I don't want to go bankrupt over exorbitant drug prices.

One immunosuppressant costs $3000 per month; my copay is $85.
I'm in treatment for graft vs. host disease and red cell aplasia following a bone marrow transplant.
One immunosuppressant costs $3000 per month; my copay is $85. Once I hit the Medicare Part D "donut hole" it costs $750 per month for 3 months. Last year I spent $16,000 on medical bills, quickly using up my retirement savings. I don't want to go bankrupt over exorbitant drug prices. Even old, standard ointments like Lidocaine cost $250.00 for a 15g tube.
Diane F.

Some of these drugs are not new ones; they have been around for over 25 years. They used to cost very little.

I had my first heart attack, and I am having to spend over $500 a month to take the cardiac medications I require.
I had my first heart attack, and I am having to spend over $500 a month to take the cardiac medications I require.
Some of these drugs are not new ones; they have been around for over 25 years. They used to cost very little.
Kenneth W.

In January, the cost will skyrocket, and I will stop taking the drug because I will not be able afford the co-pay.

I currently self-inject a medication to slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis.
I currently self-inject a medication to slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis.
My co-pay is barely affordable. In January, the cost will skyrocket, and I will stop taking the drug because I will not be able afford the co-pay. This will change the course of the quality of my life in a hugely negative way. I’m terrified.
M'Lis G.

For the last couple of years, I have had to stop taking most of my meds because I can’t afford them.

I’m taking my life in my hands when I go without my meds!
I take many prescription drugs as I have several different health problems.
My husband and I are on Social Security. We have no other income as our savings has been used for all my medical bills. For the last couple of years, I have had to stop taking most of my meds because I can’t afford them. They get more expensive year by year. What are we supposed to do? I’m taking my life in my hands when I go without my meds!!
Rae A.

There are plenty of times I don’t take the medications I need because I can’t afford the co-pays.

I live in fear.
There are plenty of times I don't take medications I need because I can't afford the co-pays.
I am on Social Security and Medicare, but co-pays on a fixed income are hard to afford. I have COPD, back problems, and non-alcohol related cirrhosis. I live in fear.
Theresa S.

I’ve had to cut out needed medications because of the high cost.

Even with insurance, I just can’t afford them because I am on a limited income.
I’ve had to cut out needed medications because of the high cost.
Even with insurance, I just can’t afford them because I am on a limited income.
David D.

My husband has serious eye disease and is at risk of going blind, but his meds are more than we can afford on a fixed income.

My husband has serious eye disease and is at risk of going blind, but his meds are more than we can afford on a fixed income.
Geraldine P.

Last month one of my prescription medications went from $107 for a 1-month supply to $186 for a 1- month supply, and that is the generic form.

Last month one of my prescription medications went from $107 for a 1-month supply to $186 for a 1- month supply, and that is the generic form.
Jeff T.

[My son] uses a rescue inhaler instead that barely works just to survive.

Without insurance, the inhaler that he must have is $400 a month, which he cannot afford.
My son has asthma.
Without insurance, the inhaler that he must have is $400 a month, which he cannot afford. Instead, [he] uses a rescue inhaler that barely works just to survive.
Danny R.

Then my employer switched to another insurance plan, and I now have to pay over $1000 a month for my prescription..

Three years ago, I was paying $50 every 90 days for the medication I take to stop my migraines.
I suffer from daily, debilitating chronic migraines.
Three years ago, I was paying $50 every 90 days for the medication I take to stop my migraines. Then my employer switched to another insurance plan, and I now have to pay over $1000 a month for my prescription. I simply can’t afford that and try to manage without. It has resulted in many lost days of work. I am afraid of losing my job.
Cheryl M.

Medications are way too expensive. It affects my family and me.

We can't afford them.
Medications are way too expensive.
It affects my family and me. We can't afford them. We need cheaper medications.
Kadian W.

I have multiple chronic illnesses [including rheumatoid arthritis] and I can’t afford the medication.

[I have] high deductible health insurance through work.
[I have] high deductible health insurance through work.
I have multiple chronic illnesses...one of which is rheumatoid arthritis. I can't afford the medication. Even my prescription asthma medication isn't affordable - it's over $100!
Mea C.

I stopped using an inhaler because I could not afford it.

They just keep raising the prices of prescription drugs so people can’t afford them.
I can tell you that my mother’s medicine went up for diabetes, so she had to stop taking it.
It tripled in price. I stopped using an inhaler because I could not afford it. They just keep raising the prices of prescription drugs so people can’t afford them.
Robin O.

Its generic is no longer being manufactured, so Donnatal now costs $5/pill. How do I budget for that?

I have IBS and need an antispasmodic (Donnatal).
I have IBS and need an antispasmodic (Donnatal).
Its generic is no longer being manufactured, so Donnatal now costs $5/pill. How do I budget for that?
Helene S.

My cost has gone from $26 in 2011 to $157 last month.

My thyroid pills are not covered by insurance.
My thyroid pills are not covered by insurance.
My cost has gone from $26 in 2011 to $157 last month.
Linda D.

Choice [is] sometimes a roof over your head or your medication.

Insulin is out of sight price wise.
Choice [is] sometimes a roof over your head or your medication.
Insulin is out of sight price wise. Close to $200 a vial now.
Patricia Ann S.

I have to tell the pharmacy to keep [ my prescriptions] because even with insurance I can’t afford them.

It’s already hitting me hard.
It’s already hitting me hard.
I have insurance and with the price of some of my prescriptions, I have to tell the pharmacy to keep them because even with insurance I can’t afford them.
@daniel_virginia

Why shouldn’t patients be told how much drugs cost to make?

Why shouldn’t patients be told how much drugs cost to make?
@Rev_AlinS

The price is so high that I have to endure the headaches.

I suffer from debilitating headaches, controlled with sumatriptan injections.
Even with insurance, my cost is $100 per injection.
Even with insurance, my cost is $100 per injection. I'm 63 years old and on Social Security and Medicare. The price is so high that I have to endure the headaches.
Rick B.

Six years ago, I began cutting doses of four non-generics for diabetes in half or not refilling.

My husband and I shop frugally, and there's nowhere else to cut.
Six years ago, I began cutting doses of four non-generics for diabetes in half or not refilling
in order to afford four Tier 4 scripts. I don't have to remind anyone with diabetes on Medicare the obscene costs of brand name insulin and oral medications. My husband and I shop frugally, and there's nowhere else to cut.
Jo C.

Since 1998, I have taken a generic medication.

Over the years, the medication went from $5 to $10 a month and then suddenly, in 2015, it went to over $250 per month.
Since 1998, I have taken a generic medication. I was put on Corgard® (Nadolol).
Over the years, the medication went from $5 to $10 a month and then suddenly, in 2015, it went to over $250 per month. That did not include what insurance covered. I have never been able to get a straight answer from the manufacturer. As I work for a hard-working family practice doctor, I have seen it all, and this is only one of many such issues.
Diane G.

Every year when my health insurance deductible resets, I stop my treatments

because my child has asthma and his ability to breathe is more important than my ability to walk.
Every year when my health insurance deductible resets, I stop my treatments
for neuropathy and chronic pain because my child has asthma. His ability to breathe with the help of five daily medications is more important than my ability to walk.
@Mama_Mandria

My doctor wanted me on an inhalant. It was $276.

No freaking way I could afford it. This is WITH insurance.
My doctor wanted me on an inhalant.
Okay, I went to get it filled and gave it right back to the pharmacy. It was $276. No freaking way I could afford it. This is WITH insurance. I can’t take the medication and sacrifice paying my other bills.
Dianne J.

I have to use an inhaler to breathe.

I just ordered a three-month supply that cost me $571.35. That is over half of my income.
I have to use an inhaler to breathe.
I just ordered a three-month supply that cost me $571.35. I have hit the Medicare coverage gap and it isn't even a full three months into the year. That is over half of my income. That is the price with insurance. What am I supposed to do if I can’t breathe?
Patsy A.

I cannot afford $30,000/ year.

I am now without the medication that has been so effective.
Statistically, I should be in a wheelchair by now,
but with a lot of self-care and discipline, hard work and compliance with my medication and exercise, I am doing well. I've had multiple sclerosis a long time! I work part time, volunteer when I can and keep a positive spirit. I take one medication and it is to prevent the MS from worsening. My insurance pays most of it, but my co-pay is $2,500/month. I've been getting "extra help" for the copay through Social Security since my copay cost is more than my entire income. But, I just took my last dose. I was notified that I am no longer getting the assistance for the copay. I cannot afford $30,000/ year in copay. A nursing home would cost a lot more. I am now without the medication that has been so effective and am really worried.
Anna Beth A.

My family watched as I grew sicker.

I am someone’s daughter, sister, best friend, and neighbor, and we all suffered because I couldn’t afford the health care I needed.”
I am from a small town. I never had a lot of money, but I was content with life.

I worked hard and lived within my means. Then, I was diagnosed with liver disease.

I went from walking six miles a day to sleeping constantly. My doctor found a cocktail of medications that helped. But, my prescriptions were $1,900 a month, not counting doctor’s visits. Liver pills alone were around $500. This left me only $5 at the end of every two weeks for food and gas.

Eventually, I had to stop treatment to make ends meet. My family watched as I grew sicker. It wasn’t until I qualified for assistance that things started to turn around, but my body went through irreversible damage from the lapse in treatment.

I am someone’s daughter, sister, best friend, and neighbor, and we all suffered because I couldn’t afford the health care I needed.

Anna M., Missouri

But then the price went up. Way up.

When I switched to Medicare the cost became $10,000 a year. That was $2,000 for a single prescription.”
I have severe Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Luckily, I discovered Humira, a shot that could keep down inflammation and ease my bone deterioration. I received Humira for $5, with insurance. With my pain managed, I could spend time with my family and friends, my arthritis no longer dominating my life.

But then the price went up. Way up.

When I switched to Medicare, the cost became $10,000 a year. That was $2,000 for a single prescription or a $1,995 difference between insurers. How is that possible?

I wrote the manufacturer, applied for assistance, but nothing worked, so I stopped taking the drug. My bones became weak and crippled. My life was no longer my own and to this day, I still don’t know why. 

Bonnie O., Connecticut